Thunder Blade [Sega Master System] – First Impressions and Let’s Play


Just as the Sega Master System’s version of After Burner was disappointing, so too was its port of Thunder Blade, Sega’s 1987 arcade shoot ‘em up. Having not played any version of Thunder Blade beforehand, I lack a reference point for the game although I feel confident in asserting this was an underwhelming port. Its portrayal of two separate styles of gameplay was competent but bland. After encountering early difficulties, I decided against devoting too much time towards the game’s completion.

Continue reading Thunder Blade [Sega Master System] – First Impressions and Let’s Play

Sssnake [Atari 2600] – Review and Let’s Play


Besides Kangaroo, Sssnake was the other Atari 2600 game I used to take a break from the Sega Master System. It was developed and published by Data Age in 1982 and it wasn’t much fun.

I played as a big game hunter who had an unfortunate role reversal. Holed up in an Amazonian fortress, I navigated said hunter (represented by a lemon, fittingly) around the inside perimeter of his enclave while all manner of beasts attacked the outside walls. My range of movement was limited to a fixed track the hunter’s cluster gun resided on. Thankfully, the beasts posed no threat and served only as score fodder. Snakes on the other hand would slither along a predetermined path, occasionally entering the hunter’s fortress.

The rudimentary graphics abstracted much of what was presented on screen.

Although the rate of play gradually increased, the difficulty level was never much of a concern. Avoiding the snakes, the sole threat, was easily done since they never varied from their routes. The lack of difficulty meant obtaining a high score wasn’t anything to squawk about, let alone strive for. Speaking of limited variation, the entire game took place on the same unchanging stage, which fit with the backstory, but didn’t do much to keep me interested. Finally, movement was awkward due to direction limitations based around my position on either horizontal or vertical walls. It seemed like the game would’ve functioned better with paddle controllers, but that’s Sssnake in a nutshell. Had a few decisions gone differently, it may have turned out differently.

Kangaroo [Atari 2600] – Review and Let’s Play



After completing Ys: The Vanished Omens, I decided to pause my Sega Master System playthroughs and turn my attention to a couple of recently acquired Atari 2600 games. Kangaroo was the first on my list. Published by Atari in 1983, it’s a port of the Sun Electronics (Sunsoft) arcade game released the year before, itself a derivative of Nintendo’s Donkey Kong. Playing as a mother kangaroo, I had to scale three distinct stages to rescue her captive joey. Along the way, I dealt with an endless barrel of apple throwing monkeys by boxing them into submission or avoiding them altogether. Continue reading Kangaroo [Atari 2600] – Review and Let’s Play

Ys: The Vanished Omens [Sega Master System] – Walkthrough


While recording my playthrough of Ys: The Vanished Omens, I consulted the sole walkthrough available on GameFAQs every now and then. Seeing as there was just a handful of resources available for this game online, and upon realizing it was fairly straightforward, I took a shot at writing a walkthrough. Although it was a linear experience, it was still challenging composing the guide. Especially when it came time to format it to GameFAQs’ liking. Well, after many attempts, I’ve finally got the formatting as GameFAQs likes it and am now confident enough to share it here. So, if you ever need help while playing the game, give my guide a shot!

Walkthrough on GameFAQs

Final Fantasy VI [PlayStation] – Review

Final Fantasy Anthology

I don’t want this review to sound too acrimonious, but I had a lousy experience with Final Fantasy VI. It’s a game I started a couple of times over the past few years, only to burn out early on. By the time I began playing this game, soon after completing the two prior entries, I suffered from a Final Fantasy fatigue. With a few years between my last attempts, I finally restarted this summer and managed to beat it. While I enjoyed much of my playthrough this go-around, my impressions were still negatively colored by those initial burnouts, especially after listening to years of praise for this entry, often cited as the greatest in the series. Opinions are malleable, and mine will undoubtedly grow rosy with the passing of time, but as of this writing I feel this is the weakest Final Fantasy on the Super Nintendo. Continue reading Final Fantasy VI [PlayStation] – Review

Ys: The Vanished Omens [Sega Master System] – Review

Ys The Vanished Omens

Nihon Falcom’s Ys: The Vanished Omens was originally released on a variety of Japanese home computers in 1987, and is the first entry in the long-running and still active, action-RPG series. The Sega Master System version served as the North American debut, and it came courtesy of Sega, in 1988. Although I’ve been interested in the games since discovering them many years ago, completing this version marked the first time I’ve actually played an entry, and I enjoyed the heck out of it! Narrative was light, and it proved to be a succinct and straightforward adventure, despite copious amounts of backtracking. Similarly, grinding was prevalent but it didn’t bog down the simplistic action-RPG combat. The combat was buoyed by light strategic elements and a series of fun boss fights. Now having firsthand experience with an entry, it’s easy to see why the series has stuck around.

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Ys: The Vanished Omens [Sega Master System] – Let’s Play

Ys The Vanished Omens - Japanese Box Art

After spending some time with After Burner and Ghost House on the Sega Master System I finally found a title to sink my teeth into. Ys: The Vanished Omens is the first game in Nihon Falcom’s long-running action-RPG series. Released for the system in 1988, I really enjoyed it and intend to publish a walkthrough and a review in due time.

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